Plant Possibilities

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This past year, I have gotten pretty into plants… and while I somehow manage to keep myself alive, I’ve never been great at keeping my green friends thriving. While plants are such an important part of decorating a space, I never really had an interest in them until I visited the store Moss in Iowa City. Full disclaimer here: I was totally one of the people that made fun of the store when they first opened because I thought there was no way that they’d be able to create a sustainable business selling moss, succulents, pots, and other small gifts! There was no way!!! But, I must say, after my first time ever visiting the store… it wasn’t long before I was a regular customer.

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I became obsessed with the way cacti and succulents looked and the way that a little greenery could brighten your whole mood in a room. Anytime I saw a plant on sale- I snatched it up and started looking for creative ways to give it a new home. Although I had a new passion of indoor gardening, it didn’t mean I was good at it. I’d try propagating (taking leaves from plants to grow a new plant) clippings co-workers would give me. Everyone else’s would grow 3 times as fast, most of mine would shrivel out, and even when one started to grow it took FOREVER. I began to think that maybe plants weren’t the thing for me.

 

 

When I moved to LA, I had to say buh-bye to the plants I’d cared for so much in the past year and left them in the care of my mom. (The plants actually seem to be thriving, but I have no idea how because she’s not great with plants either.) I’m surrounded by green-thumbs though (which only seems to frustrate me more at my lack of ability.) Before moving I helped my Uncle (who has basically converted half of his house into a greenhouse) plant seeds in preparation for the Summer. He had the whole set up including proper lighting, watering techniques, potting materials, you name it! Then there’s my boyfriend who can find a seed or leaf on the ground and three days later it’s over growing its pot.

I wasn’t ready to give up. Now that I’m finally starting to get settled in my apartment and making it look like a home (the reveal will be soon I swear just waiting on a few final touches like plants, pictures, and artwork) I could see that I was missing something—plants. I also need something to “take care of” and I’m nowhere near ready for the responsibility of a dog so plants it is.

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In California there are soooo many floral shops, nurseries, and gardens BUT plants can be really expensive. This weekend I went with a friend of mine to the Los Angeles Flower District. Basically, is about 4 square blocks of nothing but floral and plant shops. They’re these warehouse buildings that have all different kinds of flower venders selling fresh cut flowers, house plants, outdoor plants, pots, and plant accessories. Whether interested in buying plants or not it’s quite the experience! It will overwhelm your senses with bright and beautiful colors and everywhere you go it sells so amazing. The absolute best part though, is that it’s incredibly cheap. Tiny baby succulents for $1 each and taller house plants for $20 -$90 depending on the size of the plant.

 

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So here’s what all I walked away with: 1 tall tree thing, 1 small standard house plant, 1 standard vine plant, 1 bigger succulent grouping, 6 baby succulents, and 5 pots all for about $60-$70! What a steal!!! I wanted so much more but thought this was a good place to start. Obviously I don’t know any of the technical names being new to this plant thing and having done no research. None of them were really labeled at the store so if you know what they are or what they’re called, please let me know.

 

 

Logistics: The flower district is located downtown LA close to the fashion district. There’s plenty of parking available in the area, most of it was $5-10 depending on how long you’ll be there. The parking lots are very close so if you need to make a few trips like we did it’s super easy to do!  The market is during the morning and I believe it ends at 2:00 pm so plan accordingly. We met there at 11:00 and made a lap around to all the shops and scoped things out for about an hour then went back through and made our purchases. To go into the original LA Flower Market we had to pay $1. Although its cheap and you think that it’s going to be worth it, we actually had better luck at all the surrounding shops.

 

Since it’s down town there are soooo many ways to make a day out of it if you’re already making the drive. The arts district (which I still need to check out) and the ROW DTLA are close by (driving distance though.) We drove a little way to go to lunch at Bottega Louie —so good but there are also sooooo many options to stop and eat at just be prepared you’ll have to pay for parking again. I had an event later that day that was also down town at the LA Center for Digital Art, so I went and parked again in that area and walked around until I found a coffee shop where I could sit and write this blog post! I found the neatest little space with this tiny, all glass coffee shop in the middle of all these apartment buildings called Tilt Coffee. It was just what I needed. It’s the best kind of treat yourself and your apartment kind of day!

All About Art

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IMG_7368You know…? I’m all about the art! I always have been. You name it, movies, television, music, theater, but mostly visual arts from crafting and sewing to basically anything that allows you to make something out of nothing (except for baking that is, I’m still working on how to do that successfully.) 

I’ve always been a creative person!  I don’t know that it was ever a conscious decision to pursue art but more so that I was always taking small steps that would lead me down that road. In fact, it wasn’t until my final years of high school that I even found graphic design and digital design. I did, however, know I needed a job that would allow me to be creative, think outside the box and provide a lot of variety.  I remember in fourth grade for career day all the girls were dressed up as teachers and nurses while all the boys wanted to be famous athletes and scientist. Me on the other hand, I showed up with a mood board (complete with fabric and paint swatches) and rendered drawings of a dream house because I wanted to have my own HGTV show one day.  (Sharing my ideas on a blog and social media is the next best thing to having my own tv show these days!)

So, I’ve always felt a connection with art, creativity, and other artists BUT I know that’s not the case for everyone. If you think art museums and exhibits sound boring, well keep reading because I’m writing this blog for you whether you think you’ll like it or not!  This week I’m here to offer up ways you can bring art into your own life in a fun and approachable way that works for you! Just stay with me…

Trust me, I get it! There was a time growing up that I thought visiting an art museum sounded like torture (I was probably five, but that’s not the point.)  In our culture, art museums sometimes get a “tricky” reputation.  They’re often thought of as being too prestigious, upper class, for people that have a higher education level and a big wallet… this is no longer the case and, in some places, it’s actually the exact opposite. Art and society generally follow suit with one another.  With the way our world is changing right now and growing to have a more open understand of other people, cultures, and lifestyles the art community is too.

I didn’t fully begin to appreciate art history and museums until I got to college.  Until then, I just like to make things and create my own art and not put much thought into it.  As part of my degree requirements I had to take a number of art history classes. I knew going into these classes that it’d be hard.  I knew art history meant learning hundreds of different dates and movements, learning words from other languages, and having to spell things like baroque and cubism and also be able to tell you what those words mean.  Don’t get me wrong-it was hard, and it could also be incredibly confusing at times.  Surprisingly though, my art history classes became some of my favorites (even despite they’re early start times and that they met on Fridays.)  Art history changed my life and outlook on art completely. It opened my mind up and changed my college experience for the better.

Art history classes taught me about other cultures, religions, and history that I hadn’t otherwise really been exposed to. It encouraged me to travel the world and look to the past to understand other people and traditions. It gave me a further appreciation and understanding for things that came and existed before me as well as for the things that will outlive me.  Now every time I step foot in an art museum, I’m reminded of all of these things.

I have been incredibly blessed to be able to travel around the world and our country.  In some cases, I was even fortunate enough to get to see the paintings, sculptures, or buildings that I’ve studied in real life. There’s nothing that can describe the feeling I get when I turn around a corner in a museum and find myself standing face to face with the statue of David or gazing into Van Gogh’s Starry Night. I literally lose my breath and just try to take it all in. Now, I don’t expect everyone to have the same reaction or get as much out of it as I do, but you may just surprise yourself.

Another stereotype closely related to the art world is you have to be rich to see it, to travel to it, or to have it in your home… all of this-not true.  Whether in a large metropolitan area or a smaller suburban or rural town, art is all around you and I guarantee you can find it if you’re willing to look. If you don’t believe me, the first place I’d start looking in your area is a local college campus.  They’ve got to have something going on whether it’s a student show or a private collection of work in a gallery it could be worth your while to look into it.  If you find yourself somewhere like New York, don’t let the prices scare you!  A lot of the museums offer different discounts and pricing options, some even take donations rather than set a strict ticket price.

Once you find one and once you get in, then what? What do you look at? How long are you supposed to look at things? What all are you supposed to read?  What if I don’t get it? 

These are ALL valid questions and my answer to all of them is to stop worrying and do what feels right. Other than being quiet and not running sprints down the hallway, there’s not much “right” or “wrong” to an art museum.

IMG_4170If you aren’t drawn to something right away (or if you think it’s absolutely horrible and don’t understand it as I first felt with abstract art and work by Matisse) I challenge you to just take a brief moment to ask yourself, why don’t I like this piece?  Your answer could surprise you and even lead your mind down a rabbit hole to discover something new… but if it doesn’t ring any bells or take you on a journey then on to the next one I say.

I guarantee when you visit a museum, you’re going to see a lot of art that you’d never want to hang on your wall or put in your house (but that’s why it’s hanging a museum and not over your mantel)  The point is you came to this place, you saw the things, you thought about it, and it gave you a reaction (that reaction could be “wow this is amazing” or “this is horrible.”)  An artist’s most basic goal though, is to get a reaction… might not be the one they had in mind but none the less, they just want to shake up something in you. Try your best to keep an open mind and give it a chance.

Believe it or not museums aren’t just paintings hung on walls these days.  There’s actually a lot of artist that are trying to change the traditional “museum” experience and setting AND there’s a lot more work and thought that goes into it than you’d think.  I myself got to explore and experience this logic myself when I created and curated my first show, Married to my Work.  It was my goal to break these art and museum stereotypes and create a space that was welcoming, memorable, and encouraged you to get involved and play a part in the art. (To read more about my own art show click here: Married to My Work.)

This idea of creating a welcome space is popping up everywhere and LA has some of the greatest examples.  If a traditional museum still isn’t speaking to you then find yourself a pop-up exhibit. One of my favorite shows I’ve ever been to was a collection of work for a lot of different artists that transformed a warehouse into an immersive experience in the middle of LA called the 14th Factory organized by artist, Simon Birch(You may remember or feel like you’ve heard about it because one of the installations was knocked over by a girl taking a selfie resulting in thousands of dollars in damage… let’s take a moment to feel for her though, because I was almost that girl.  No, I wasn’t taking a selfie, but my bag did bump one of the pedestals in that same exhibit and almost knocked them over like dominos, but I was able to catch it and steady it in time…still gives me anxiety thinking about it though.)

Another, more pop-culture based exhibit is The Museum of Selfies (where a lot of my pictures have been from lately.)  This museum did aim to teach you a thing or two and not just how to take a good selfie, but it’s main purpose was to allow you to interact with different scenes and from there create your own art with your selfie.

IMG_0872Most recently my team at Florapy also attended a pop-up art show in LA called Bloom Art Show.  It was an outdoor, weekend event that was all about flowers and experiencing the beauty of nature.

See… there are so many different ways to experience art!  Change, breaking out of your comfort zone, try new things, do something different… all key parts to an art museum as well as my goals of this blog.  I’m learning from my experiences and pushing my limits with the hope that my readers will too.  I challenge all of you who have made it through this lengthy post to keep pushing your boundaries (whatever that may mean to you!) If you go to any cool museums or exhibits OR if there’s any you’d like me to check out, let me know! You know me, always looking for suggestions. If you’d like to see more of my own art and designs, visit designforthestory.com, @designforthestory on Instagram, OR just simply click the Art Work tab above!

Family Function

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The hardest factor in making the decision to move to Los Angeles was coming to realize that meant moving far away from my family.

It’s not the first time that I’ve been a plane ride away from them, but it is the first time that I’ve moved without having a deadline attached. (Before I’d moved for at most a summer at a time, once to LA for the internship and once to Italy to study abroad.)

This past year I lived at home with my parents for the first time in four years, and I have a lot to say about it. Let me start by saying I never in a million years thought I’d move back home again. While at college, I couldn’t imagine giving up my lifestyle to move back to Boone again.

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Here’s a little background about my family—it’s very small. I have my parents, my brother, my grandpa, and one uncle that all live in the town I grew up in. I have an aunt, two cousins, and an uncle all within a 30-minute drive from Boone.  Then I have three aunts, three uncles, and two cousins that all live either a long drive or flight away (I don’t get to see them that often but when I do, it’s a party!)  So, for me, it feels very small but for a lot of us, it’s allowed us to form a closer relationship because we’re so small.

Although I’ve always gotten along really well with my family and have great relationships with them, When I left for college I had no intentions of ever going back again (well, not for a long period of time I mean). But after graduating, I had no money and I was starting a job in Des Moines, so it just made the most sense to move back in with them.  Yes, it was also the smartest decision financially.  I was able to save up some money that would eventually allow me to make the move to California.  I also had a roof over my head, a refrigerator that was fully stocked, and roommates that loved me very much.

The situation at first didn’t sound ideal. A lot of my friends were moving away, starting big careers, getting cool apartments, meeting new people, and at first, I felt stuck and disappointed that all I had to look forward to was moving back home. I quickly realized however, that moving home was exactly what I needed. I needed that time to be back in Boone and close to my friends and family again for many reasons.

It was nice having both my parents so close again.  I got to go back to some of my favorite old routines like taking a Sunday afternoon nap while golf or football played in the background and take the dogs for walks over to my grandpa’s house with my mom.  I really got to focus on family again and formed even greater relationships with my parents that I’ll forever be grateful for.  Moving back home, I finally got to be a part of events that I’d been missing out on the past four years like birthday celebrations, family card games, and my brother and cousin’s athletic events.

I got to watch my brother leave for college and start his experience at my alma mater. I got to spend quality time with my Boone Goon friends and reconnect with them on a deeper level rather than just brief visits here and there. My grandpa’s house was within walking distance again and I could just pop over there whenever I needed someone to talk to, needed something to do, or needed to win a game of Cribbage.

Moving home was crucial to my transition from college to adult life.  Leaving behind the life I had created in Iowa City, the friends, the routines, and the structure of being a student was very hard.  I needed the familiarity of a home for a while before I was able to make a bigger change and start somewhere totally new. When it comes to family and relationships it was one of the best decision I have ever made and I’m so thankful for that time I got to share with everyone, BUT yes it seemed to make my decision to move that much harder!

Ultimately I knew I’d miss my family and miss out on a lot of milestones for the people I love. I also knew though, that I needed to start focusing on building my own life and a career that would give me as much joy as possible. I needed to get out of the comfort zone and try something new.

Another big transition that came along with my move is that my parents also decided to move to a new home as well (same town but new neighborhood & house). I thought the idea of leaving my childhood home would be a lot harder and don’t get me wrong there were times in my life that I would have been devastated to have to say goodbye to my tiki hut room.  But after spending that extra year living there, I found peace with the idea of my parent moving and that house no longer being ours.

When they were debating on moving, I knew that I was also moving and this time with the intentions of starting my own life and not planning to live in Iowa again any time soon. I began to realize that I didn’t need the space as much as I knew I needed the people (and dogs) in it and the town that surrounds it.

When my parents told me they bought a house, I was so happy for them. It’s a new adventure and chapter in their lives as well. It’ll be weird at first to visit and go to a different neighborhood and sleep in a different room, but a little change is good. Sometimes, getting too comfortable can hold people back and stop them from chasing their dreams (it almost did me!)

If you find yourself in the middle of a big transition, try your best to embrace the period of change and think about all the positive outcomes that can come out of it. If you’re worried about moving back home because it seems like a failure or step back—it isn’t, it’s smart! I promise you’ll never regret that time with your loved ones or regret the money you saved.  Use the time to enjoy the people around you as much as you can for as long as you’re there.

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Taking on Traffic

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(While this picture wasn’t taken in LA and it isn’t me driving…. It is still my car and I took it!)

Well… I’m not an Iowa any morethat’s for sure. When you come to visit or move to LA if the palm trees and sunshine aren’t enough to immediately tell you you’re in a new place then it’s only a matter of time before you find yourself stuck in traffic on the 101 freeway and the message reads loud and clear.  Traffic here really does suck.

There are a lot of rumors that surround Los Angeles and transportation (but there are a lot of truths about them too).  In just a short time of living in LA spread out over a few years, I’ve experienced it all from using public transportation, trying out all the rideshare services, and even driving!

Everyone says that the public transportation systems suck in LA and well if you’re someone whose use to living in New York or Chicago then you’d agree. Los Angeles is a different kind of city because it’s so spread out compared to cities that have skyscrapers and believe in building up into the sky.  When I first lived in Los Angeles for a summer internship, I was testing it all out.  I lucked out rented an apartment that happened to be less than a block away from a metro stop. For me to get from my apartment in North Hollywood/Studio City all the way to Universal City for work, I walked one block, got on a metro bus for one stop, transferred to a metro subway for one stop then got off and walked across the street to work. Easy Peasy! All this took about 45 mins each way and cost about $5 round trip.  Sounds great, right? Well since moving back it’s my understanding that that was a pretty rare and unique experience that I’ll probably never find again.

Unless you find yourself in a similar situation where you live in close proximity to a stop, it can be very challenging.  There’s not very much parking at the metro stops and stations so you have to walk or Uber to catch a metro ride. The metro lines aren’t as well connected as in other cities either. You could find yourself in a situation where you have to go all the way downtown to make your connection train and then back track on a different line to get to the neighborhood you work in! But none the less public transportation does exist if you’re willing to make it work.  I also think that most of us are too stuck in our ways and tailored to this idea that “we have to drive” to even find a route or see if there’s a public transportation option available to us. Not as many people are willing to trade in their road rage for sitting next to strangers, but if you’re the kind of person that can actually get your morning started by either answering emails, reading a book, or even taking a little snooze in public—then it could definitely be worth checking out! Yes, it might take you a little longer, but you have more of an opportunity to make that time worth it and be productive.

One morning during my internship, I woke up a little later than usual and knew I wasn’t going to make it on time if I took the subway.  I decided to Uber instead and actually learned that going to work in the mornings was cheaper and quicker by Ubering rather than public transportation. The Uber ride would take 15 minutes and cost about $1.75… purely amazing and life changing (I now had an extra 15 minutes to get ready every morning or get to work even that much earlier which for me is a big deal!)

 

When I lived in LA the first time Uber and Lyft were still pretty new concepts to me, but before long they became my life line.  When my mom and I arrived at LAX we had plans to immediately rent a car for the weekend, but that idea quickly turned into a nightmare. Long story short, I’m just going to let you know that I will never try renting a car from a rental place close to LAX ever again.  If you’re here for a short period of time, trust me it’s not worth the stress, waiting, and money!  Just download a rideshare app instead- I swear! I convinced my mom right then and there we were going to just Uber all weekend and 12 minutes later our driver was coming to pick us up and saved us from all the struggles.

Uber has been a life saver in many different moments. It made getting around in Los Angeles easy, “quicker,” and was pretty affordable considering the alternatives. My mom and I both loved getting to meet different drivers and hearing their advice and life stories while we also got to sit back, relax, and not worry about directions, parking, or which exit to take. People often get in the discussion of whether Uber or Lyft is better, and everyone has a different response. Some drivers drive for both services and will tell you different things. For me, they’re both about equal. I’ve had great luck with both and some frustrating moments with both. Most importantly I’ve always felt safe on both and when there were times I ran into issues both customer services responded quickly and were very helpful! If I have time and am not in a hurry I usually check the rate with both and then pick which ever one will be cheaper. Usually though, they’re pretty close so I pick whichever one can have a driver there the quickest.

My favorite thing to do in LA (in terms of traveling and traffic that is) is to take Uber pool. Uber pools or Lyft Lines are ride options offered in the app (they’re usually only offered in your major metropolitan areas though). They allow parties of 1-2 riders to share their ride with another rider usually for ½ the price of the original ride. Generally speaking it only adds an additional 15-30 mins onto your trip.  I’ve seen some of the neatest areas and neighborhoods and met some amazing people all because of Uber pool. For example, one Saturday I was going to Manhattan Beach and we stopped and picked up another girl in her mid-twenties who was also headed to that beach. Neither of us were meeting anyone until later that afternoon so we decided we’d just go to the beach together and hangout. We spent the entire afternoon discussing our lives back and forth with a complete stranger and then at the end of the day we both went our separate ways- but it was a really great time.

While that was an amazing experience, you do have to be careful and smart about it. Although I haven’t had any bad experiences, I do choose not to pool later in the evening or when I’m closer to certain areas of town. Also, as often as you meet some neat people you’ll also get passengers who do not want talk or even look at you (we all have those days). If you’re in a hurry and crunched for time, don’t rely on pool just because it’s cheaper.  It’s not always a guarantee that they’ll get you there on time especially with traffic. Do everyone a favor and pay the few dollars more just to take your own ride in those situations.

When I moved back to LA a month ago I had decided not to bring my car and planned on ridesharing everywhere. I wanted to get reacquainted with the area once again and I wanted to see if I really needed truly needed a car… Almost immediately I regretted that decision. Uber prices had definitely gone up and I was living in a less central area compared to North Hollywood (now I’m in the San Fernando Valley). My expenses were rapidly adding up and it took too much time to plan ahead to rideshare.  So, I needed my car but now that I had a new job and I couldn’t go back to Iowa to get it. I had looked into shipping it and that was going to cost about $2,000 which did not seem worth it.  On to plan b… My boyfriend, being as great as he is, agreed to drive it out to me. I’ve had a car now for two weeks, which I know doesn’t seem like a long time, but it’s made all the difference. I was beyond nervous to drive at first… I had no idea of how to really get anywhere and I had never drove in traffic like this before. But now, I’m thinking to myself, what was I so nervous for. Right now, I live and work in the valley which is no different than driving in town in places like Iowa City or Ankeny, Iowa. Yes, the freeways are a little different though especially during rush-hour. I’ll tell you what though, I’d rather drive in LA than Chicago because at least people here are lucky to be moving 10 miles an hour where in Chicago everyone’s flying down the interstate at 85 miles per hour. The biggest thing you have to pay attention for is people cutting you off and swerving in and out of lanes usually without using turn signals. Motorcycles are also terrifying because they can weave in and out of traffic going 60 miles an hour even if you’re stopped. If you stay alert and pay attention though, you’ll be fine! Just stay focused on your lane and the lanes next to you, be greedy when you need to be, don’t be a jerk, and take turns when you can!

 

There’s another key difference when driving in LA (typically the guys you’re with will notice it first). If you’re anything like my boyfriend, Dad, or Uncle the first thing you realize is that you’re always surrounded by fancy cars. The people here drive a lot of different cars than you might be used to. My dream Mercedes G-Wagons are everywhere, and Tesla’s might as well be the new Prius in LA County (even cars like a Rolls-Royce aren’t that uncommon). Make sure to keep your eyes on the road though so that you don’t accidently fender-bender a Lamborghini.

(And then there’s cars in Cali like these…good thing though, people would see me coming from a mile away.)

 

If you’ve ever lived in Iowa City, you know parking there sucks so naturally I was worried what it’d be like in LA but honestly, it’s not that bad in most neighborhoods. There’s a lot more street parking then you’d think (but you better be ready to parallel park), parking garages are actually pretty cheap especially with store validation, and you can valet at almost every restaurant for like $8-10 plus tip if you’re really in a hurry to meet someone.

Overall the rumors are pretty accurate. While living in LA without a car isn’t impossible, it certainly makes life more difficult if you’re living here long term or commuting to work every day. I’ll leave you with a few more tips to take into consideration if you’re planning to visit or make a move. Don’t pay attention to how many miles something is away. That number means nothing here and will actually make you more frustrated. When plugging an address or location into Google Maps just look at the time of how long it’s going to take you to get there. Next tip is to then plan accordingly. Always give yourself at least 15-30 minutes more than it says you need to get there whether you’re driving or ridesharing. Accidents do happen frequently which is usually why the freeways can get backed up at any time of the day. Most importantly just keep an open mind. Expect traffic so then when you hit a rare patch of no traffic it’ll feel like a winning situation. Last but not least, if you do find yourself getting behind the wheel use your GPS, stay focused, keep a spare phone charger in your car, and just go for it. If I can find my way around and maneuver the traffic being the most defensive Midwest driver there is, you’ll be fine!

Working Woman

 

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Wow, ya know what?! It’s been almost exactly one year since I graduated from the University of Iowa and I must say all things considering I’ve been beyond fortunate this past year.

I believe this was one of the toughest years of my life (and I’ve heard that my fellow classmates can relate) because for the first time my next step wasn’t already pre-determined. When we grow up our parents are making all of our decisions for us–what to eat, what to do today, where to go to school, yada yada yada.  Then once we start to think we’re gaining our independence in middle school, we start to do what society tells us to (or in some cases the exact opposite.)

Next, we go to high school, then college, and then a few prolong the inevitable and go to more college BUT THEN when you do graduate or call it quits on school you find out you’re all on your own. “Go find a job” (if only it really was that simple) and then for the first time you’ve truly got to figure it out on your own, but at the same time it’s not really even up to you.  Now your fate is in a complete stranger’s hand.

When applying to jobs, getting jobs, and working jobs all we can do is our very best and try to exceed their expectations every step of the way. Coming out of college I was very lucky to have had over a year’s experience working in my field of study, graphic design. I had worked as an assistant graphic designer at Hancher Auditorium (the best 😉 performing arts venue in the Midwest) and had an internship with NBCUniversal (where I fell in love with LA.) Plus years of student organization leadership experience and other miscellaneous jobs.

About a week before college graduation I received my first full time job offer.  After a lot of thinking, I decided to accept the position of Senior Graphic Designer at Mittera Creative Agency in Des Moines, Iowa (thus prolonging my dream of moving west for a little longer.) At Mittera I worked alongside a great group of talented individuals and an amazing core group of inspiring women. I learned so much by working with clients like Hy-Vee, Schnucks, and even a little Theisen’s.  While agency life was exhausting and easy to complain about, I’m beyond grateful. The friends I’ve made and the lessons I’ve learned about design, working, business, people, and myself made the entire experience worth it.  After 9 months of working there, it’s true Mittera made a lot of decisions for me when they let me, and half the team go but they pushed me to stop waiting and to go after my dreams.

 

 

From January to March I’d been applying to jobs like crazy all over the world.  I traveled to New York to visit a friend and see what I thought of the city, but even after all that contemplating I knew LA still had my heart. I got in contact with a few talent/recruiting agencies here in LA and in the end ended up enrolling in four different companies’ systems. (I’ll save that for another topic one day.)  Once I moved out here, the different agencies had already helped me set up a number of interviews.  After a week I had already been offered a job. I took the temporary freelance position with Roberts Beauty’s skincare line Florapy Beauty.  Here I am currently providing creative and art direction for the brand as well as creating content and developing their digital engagement. (make sure to follow @florapybeauty on Instagram to see exactly what I’m doing) So far, it’s so great. I’m really enjoying the brand, the creative freedom, and again another strong, smart group of women to work with.

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Cinco de Mayo Party @ Robert’s Cosmetics

I’m not sure what will happen next but I’m enjoying the moment and promise to keep you posted. So far all of these experiences have taught me that you can make any career happen if you want it enough and are willing to make the necessary sacrifices to make it happen. Of course, the flipside of that is also knowing your worth as an employee and as a talented and skilled person. Don’t be afraid to stand up for yourself and your abilities and don’t settle for less. Only you can hold yourself back!